Those calling for an end to the practice of “trophy hunting” often suggest photo-tourism as an alternative way of supporting conservation and livelihoods.

While photo-tourism can be an effective form of wildlife based tourism, it is simply not feasible in all areas.

Factors such as low wildlife densities, lack of scenic landscapes and the absence of transport links, limit the types of areas that can implement photo-tourism.

In the absence of viable alternatives, hunting remains an essential wildlife management tool that can be used to support conservation and human livelihoods.

For the fifth edition of Debunking the Myths, we compare the hunting and photo-tourism industries, and the differences between both forms of wildlife based tourism.

 

See graphic below provided by CIC on Debunking the Myth: Trophy Hunting Is Replaceable with Photo-Tourism.

 

References

Infographic

  1. The State of Community Conservation in Namibia – NACSO Annual Report 2017
  2. “The baby and the bathwater: trophy hunting, conservation and rural livelihoods.” – Unasylva 249 (FAO)
  3. Lindsey, P., 2010. The future of wildlife-based land uses in Botswana. Current Conservation, 3, p23.
  4. Lindsey, P., Roulet, P. and Romañach, S., 2007. Economic and conservation significance of the trophy hunting industry in sub-Saharan Africa. Biological Conservation, 134(4), pp.455-469.

Background

  1. The State of Community Conservation in Namibia – NACSO Annual Report 2017
  2. “The baby and the bathwater: trophy hunting, conservation and rural livelihoods.” – Unasylva 249 (FAO)
  3. Lindsey, P., 2010. The future of wildlife-based land uses in Botswana. Current Conservation, 3, p23.
  4. Broekhuis, F., 2018. Natural and anthropogenic drivers of cub recruitment in a large carnivore. Ecology and Evolution, 8(13), pp.6748-6755.

Please click here to see the rest of the Debunking the Myths series, where we have compiled all of the “trophy hunting” myths that have been debunked.